About

unheardnotes is the blog of composer John Richard.

John Richard

John Richard (www.JohnRichardMusic.com) grew up on a farm in rural northwest Ohio, between the towns of Deshler, Hoytville, and McComb.  He really wanted to be a farmer, a surgeon, and a starship captain, but allergies, fainting, and a fear of heights suggested that he ought to find something more suitable do.  While attending college at Huntington University, he channeled his creative impulse into writing music, and was successful enough that he went on to earn a masters degree and a doctorate in music composition.  John’s music has received performances at venues as diverse as the Creole Art Gallery in Lansing, Michigan, the Huntington University Band Festival, the Christian Fellowship of Art Music Composers National Conference, the World Saxophone Congress, and the Janacek Conservatory in Ostrava, Czech Republic.  As a composer, John has a special interest in musical form, and his writing often emphasizes the unfolding of a process or the changing relationships between musical events.  While a graduate student, John taught music theory at Butler University and theory and composition at Michigan State University.  He studied composition with Marlene Schleiffer, Michael Schelle, Jere Hutcheson, David Lipten, and Mark Sullivan.  He remains passionate about teaching and learning, and many of his students have gone on to successful careers in music despite any influence he may have had on them.  John lives in Mason, Michigan with his wife and three-year-old daughter, both of whom sing (one sings operatically and the other sings constantly), and both of whom inspire him to keep creating.

unheardnotes is a discussion of  musical composition and of issues related to being a composer.  It focuses on aspects of creating new music, compositional technique, aesthetics, working as a composer, and teaching and learning composition.  Discussion is welcome and encouraged, and you don’t need to be an expert – or even a composer – to contribute.

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